Wednesday, 25 February 2009

Medicine of Iraq: Part 1

Al Iraqiya tv channel broadcasts news of something that can be a shining beacon for Iraq.
A patient suffering from Multiple Sclerosis has undergone stem cell treatment at a hospital in Baghdad.

The patient is apparently from the UK, but how much of this is true, I have no idea. Kind of makes me laugh though. There's no IV fluids in the hospitals...but stem cell transplants-sure.
Anyway, putting complaints and the realistic situation (that is, the iraqi health sector needs so much work, that even the A team would have given up) aside, its an advancement nonetheless, and I silently wonder if this is going to be on any other news channel.

Does it bode well however that despite the sometimes overly religious government regulations that Science and Medicine are allowed to progress freely...I think it does. How much of this will change over the coming years is anyone's guess. Or perhaps i am being too philosphical, and I should just admit, that it is perhaps the lack of regulations and guidelines in Iraq concerning healthcare, that allows such treatments to be available here.

Nonetheless, it kind of gives hope amongst the ruins that is the collapsing healthcare services here. I wonder how the iraqi doctors are coping.

15 comments:

C.H. said...

Touta,

Mark my words...in the next 5 years, people from all across the Middle East are going to be gathering at Iraq's borders, trying to get in and get access to Iraq's superior medical care.

Iraq already boasts one of the most capable armies in the region, and Iraq showed its power last month when its citizens turned out to vote.

Just sit and watch Touta. I feel very confident that this will happen! What's important is that Iraqis keep up their motivation and enough of them work to become good doctors :D

geatg said...

>>CH
LOL
I know Iraq since day 0 in my misey driven life.. if it is good in sth is destruction, even though ur hopeful wishes may grow large, but in five years or so some lunatics will destroy everything in the name of this and opposing that!

>>Touta about stemcells researches I didnt see it on Iraqiya but I once read that in jordan they already have done it in alkhalidi hospital (they used bone morrow derived cells not that contraversial embryonic ones). So is it big deal ?i think it is not especially when it is still experimental and not 100% of cure.

Touta said...

CH,
"Mark my words...in the next 5 years"...I'm afraid that isn't anywhere near realistic. I do have hope, but think about it this way..war after war and battles does not suddenly heal in 5 years. I'd be lucky to think that Iraq can reach a suitable standard up until 50 years.

Geatg,
I suppose we just have to destroy the lunatic/lunacy before they start destroying Iraq (again), but you are right, it does happen in jordan, it happened in Iraq because-there's no guidelines, and virtually no one has reported this news...in case it goes wrong i presume. I don't think the patient chose Iraq over Jordan because of the superiority of healthcare in Iraq, but rather for Price.

C.H. said...

Touta, don't underestimate Iraq by any means :)

Just a year and a half ago many people across the world had written Iraq off as a hopeless "civil war". Even my father, who I have always admired for his political beliefs, lost hope at the sight of relentless terrorist attacks every day mixed in with the deaths of US and Iraqi soldiers on what seemed like an hourly basis.

But the people of Iraq turned everything around. Touta, the Iraqi Army is by far the most capable Army in the Middle East--the Lions of the IA can claim they defeated an insurgency and won one of the most brutal conflicts the Middle East has seen.

I have the same amount of confidence in Iraq's doctors and medical abilities. I wish you would have it too :D

Iraqis have shown that they can get what they want if they try hard enough. If prosperity in 5 years is what they want, they will get it. Or if they set the bar for 50 years, they will make that too. Touta, don't let anyonee--the media, disenfranchised supporters of the "resistance", or Americans like Joe Biden and Harry Reid look down on Iraq.

C.H. said...

I also wouldn't be surprised if there are daily commericial flights from Los Angeles, here in California, to Baghdad within the next decade :D

The problem you encountered in the UK is going to be a thing of the past. Touta.

JG said...

I also wouldn't be surprised if there are daily commericial flights from Los Angeles, here in California, to Baghdad within the next decade

That's certainly not an impossibility. But on the medical situation I think you should listen to what Touta is saying (she lives in Iraq, remember!) instead of telling her to be more positive.

I have the same amount of confidence in Iraq's doctors and medical abilities

It's nothing to do with how great or otherwise Iraq's doctors are. The problems are that (1)a huge number of doctors have left Iraq and (2)no matter how hard a doctor works he can only work within the system that's there and the system will not be fixed overnight or even in a few years, by all serious accounts.

Of course we should hope for the best, but let's be realistic.

Corey said...

JG, I have heard the "let's be realistic" argument before. All of the pundits, commentators, and politicians were saying the same thing when General Petraeus came to the stand to reveal that if we gave it time, things would improve in Iraq.

In the months and weeks leading up to the elections that took place last month, the doubt resurfaced again, but the Iraqi people showed the world how determined they are.

I will remind both of you of this conversation someday when we meet at a cafe in downtown Baghdad, perhaps in the next few years. Touta will be finishing her post-graduate studies and you JG, will be coming on a trip from the West Bank :D

JG said...

LOL Corey... I do appreciate your optimism.

I will remind both of you of this conversation someday when we meet at a cafe in downtown Baghdad, perhaps in the next few years

:) Mine's a turkish coffee!

C.H. said...

Mine too! Although I must admit I have never tried Turkish coffee before...I hear it is very good though :D

One time, I was in downtown San Francisco and I stopped at a Pakistani cafe. I ordered a very good coffee drink but I can't remember what it was called, lol :)

JG said...

The tea in the Middle East is very good too. I hate the tea we get here, I can't drink it at all.

C.H. said...

JG, when I stayed in Ireland, my hosts in Dublin and Sligo were offering me tea almost by the gallon, lol. I enjoyed it too!

JG said...

lol I'm not surprised. I must be one of the few people in Ireland who doesn't like tea!

I'm glad you saw Sligo. It's one of my favourite parts of the island.

Touta said...

"(1)a huge number of doctors have left Iraq and (2)no matter how hard a doctor works he can only work within the system that's there and the system will not be fixed overnight or even in a few years, by all serious accounts."

so very true.
And why not iraqi coffee?! It will make turkish coffee taste weak. lol. Actually half the cup is coffee slugde since its that thick. if you don't believe me, I'll post a photo. :D

JG said...

:)

If I ever visit Iraq - and I'd like to some day - I will try Iraqi coffee!

But OMG! I didn't thick coffee got any stronger than Turkish!

Do post a photo if you have one...:)

C.H. said...

Well Touta, tell me where I can get my hands on some Iraqi coffee and I will try some, haha :)

And yes, please do post the photo :D